33 Best Types of Foxgloves To Grow In Your Garden

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Foxgloves belong to the genus Digitalis. They are a group of around 20 species that are native to Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Canary Islands. Prized for their beautiful flowers, they are a well-known favorite among gardeners. Perhaps the most popular species is D. purpurea, or the Common Foxglove, which has numerous varieties and cultivars. 

All parts of these plants contain a substance called cardiac glycosides which are toxic if ingested. Contact with foliage can also cause skin irritation, so wearing gloves and washing your hands thoroughly after handling them is a must. However, D. purpurea is commercially grown as a source of cardiac glycosides which are used in the heart-stimulating drug Digitalis. 

These plants are typically tall, growing from 18 to 60 inches, and are often used to bring height and dimension to flower beds. Most species are biennials, with long tubular flowers which come in a myriad of colors (pink, purple, white, orange, yellow, copper).

Foxglove flowers are extremely attractive to bees and hummingbirds and are fantastic choices for pollinator gardens. 

foxglove plant

Beautiful Foxglove Varieties For Your Garden

#1 Canary Island Foxglove (D. canariensis)

One of the most exotic-looking Foxgloves, Digitalis canariensis is native to the Canary Islands and hardy to USDA zones 6-9. This plant is a biennial shrub that grows up to 5 feet tall. Flowers resemble the typical Foxglove to some degree, but have a more flattened appearance and are a fiery, reddish-orange, or apricot color. 

#2 Rusty Foxglove (D. ferruginea)

The award-winning Rusty Foxglove (Award of Garden Merit from The Royal Horticultural Society), can grow up to 5 feet high and has 2-3 foot tall spikes which are adorned with flowers. Blooming from late spring to early summer, flowers are funnel-shaped and up to 1.5 inches long. They are cream to golden-brown with rust-colored veining. Native to Europe, they are suited to zones 4-9 and look great in prairie gardens. 

#3 Yellow Foxglove (D. grandiflora)

This Foxglove flower, native to central Europe, Turkey, and Siberia, is hardy to zones 3-8. Naturally found in forests or stream banks, it should be planted in full sun to partial shade and would make a great addition to a woodland or cottage-style garden. It grows up to 3 feet tall and has delicate, pale yellow flowers with a brown spotted throat. 

#4 Carillon (D. grandiflora)

Carillon is a winner of the Award of Garden Merit from The Royal Horticultural Society and is a clump-forming Foxglove plant. It grows up to 18 inches tall and has pale-yellow flowers with brown spotted throats. It is hardy to zones 3-8 and looks best when grown in groups of 3-4 plants. 

#5 Grecian Foxglove (D. lanata)

Also known as the Woolly Foxglove, this plant blooms from June-August and is suitable for zones 4-9. It is clump-forming and reaches up to 24 inches high. Flowers grow along one side of the spike and are cream to pale yellow with brown veins. 

#6 Sunset Foxglove (D. obscura)

The Sunset Foxglove is a beautiful shrub that grows up to 24 inches high and blooms from late spring to mid-summer. Flowers are slender tubes that are orange-yellow with red veins inside. Hardy to zones 4-8, this plant is native to Spain and will self-seed freely under optimum conditions. 

#7 Small-flowered Foxglove (D. parviflora)

Hardy to zones 4-8, this award-winning Foxglove flower (Award of Garden Merit from The Royal Horticultural Society), is native to Mediterranean regions. Growing up to 24 inches tall with lance-shaped leaves, the Small-flowered Foxglove is prized for its beautiful, rich flowers which are packed tightly on the spike. Blooms are chocolate-colored with subtle purple veins and a rich, brown lower lip. 

#8 Common Foxglove (D. purpurea)

Easily the most iconic Foxglove flower, Digitalis purpurea is a firm favorite of gardeners. Native to Western Europe and hardy to zones 4-8, this tall perennial reaches up to 5 feet high, with beautiful, tubular, purple-pink flowers adorning one side of a spike. Flower throats have white ringed, maroon speckles. Bloom time is from early to mid-summer.

#9 Camelot Lavender (D. purpurea)

Part of the “Camelot Series” and winner of the Award of Garden Merit from The Royal Horticultural Society, Camelot Lavender is suitable for zones 5-9. This plant grows up to 4 feet high, and unlike most Foxgloves, flowers in its first year. Blooms are a delicate pale-lavender with a maroon-dotted throat. Bloom time can extend beyond 4 weeks due to the production of high-quality secondary spikes. Flowers are not one-sided as in other species but adorn the whole spike.

#10 Camelot Rose (D. purpurea)

Camelot Rose is part of the “Camelot Series” and a winner of the Award of Garden Merit from The Royal Horticultural Society. Suitable for zones 5-9, this plant grows up to 4 feet high, and unlike most Foxgloves, flowers in its first year. Blooms are eye-catching, bright pink, with a maroon speckled throat. Bloom time can extend beyond 4 weeks due to the production of high-quality secondary spikes. Flowers are not one-sided as in other species but adorn the whole spike.

#11 Camelot White (D. purpurea)

Another member of the “Camelot Series” and a recipient of the Award of Garden Merit from The Royal Horticultural Society. Camelot White is suitable for zones 5-9 and grows up to 4 feet high. Unlike most Foxgloves, it flowers in its first year, with lovely pure white blooms dotted with bronze at the throat. Bloom time can extend beyond 4 weeks due to the production of high-quality secondary spikes.

#12 Candy Mountain (D. purpurea)

Foxglove flower Candy Mountain is hardy to zones 5-9 and grows up to 4 feet tall. It blooms from early to mid-summer and has bright, rose-pink flowers. Throats are pale and dotted with darker spots. This variety looks lovely in cottage-style or coastal gardens.

#13 Dalmatian Creme (D. purpurea)

Part of the “Dalmation Series” and winner of the Award of Garden Merit from The Royal Horticultural Society, Dalmatian Creme has cream flowers with dark-purple speckled throats. This Foxglove blooms from early to mid-summer and is suitable for zones 5-9. This plant is noted for its compact foliage.

#14 Dalmatian Peach (D. purpurea)

Award-winner Dalmatian Peach (Award of Garden Merit from The Royal Horticultural Society), is part of the “Dalmatian Series” and suitable for zones 5-9. This Foxglove is likely to bloom in its first year and has lovely peach flowers with orange speckled throats. This plant blooms from early to mid-summer and is noted for its compact foliage.

#15 Dalmatian Purple (D. purpurea)

Another member of the “Dalmation Series” and winner of the Award of Garden Merit from The Royal Horticultural Society, Dalmatian Purple has lilac-purple flowers with maroon speckled throats. This plant blooms from early to mid-summer (typically in its first year) and is suitable for zones 5-9. This Foxglove plant is noted for its compact foliage.

#16 Dalmatian White (D. purpurea)

Dalmatian White, a part of the “Dalmatian Series” and a recipient of the Award of Garden Merit from The Royal Horticultural Society. It is a compact Foxglove, reaching up to 24 inches only, with pure white flowers that have dark-purple speckled throats. Hardy to zones 5-9, it may bloom in its first year. 

#17 Excelsior Group (D. purpurea)

A winner of Garden Merit from the Royal Horticultural Society, the “Excelsior Group” is hardy to zones 5-9 and produces plants that have delightful pastel-colored flowers. Flowers can be pink, white, yellow, and lavender, with purple or maroon, spotted throats. These plants may reach up to 6 feet tall and are perfect for adding height and dimension to flower beds. 

#18 Pam’s Choice (D. purpurea)

Foxglove Pam’s Choice is an eye-catching plant that reaches up to 4 feet high. Blooming from late spring to mid-summer, it is suitable for zones 5-9 and produces white flowers with heavily spotted dark purple throats. It naturalizes easily and will readily self-seed under optimum conditions.

#19 Polkadot Princess (D. purpurea)

Polkadot Princess is known for its long blooming season of bright pink flowers which extends from late spring through to fall. It is hardy to zones 5-9 and may reach 36 inches. This variety is sterile, so will not self-seed in the garden. 

#20 Purple Carousel (D. purpurea)

Purple Carousel from the “Carousel Series” grows up to 3 feet tall and is hardy to zones 4-8. This Foxglove plant has enchanting purple flowers, and throats have white ringed, maroon speckles. 

#21 Serendipity (D. purpurea)

A unique and unusual Foxglove flower, rather than tubular-shaped flowers, Serendipity has separate, distinct petals. Blooms are pale pink flushed with white, spotted inside with white ringed maroon speckles. This plant is sterile and grows up to 48 inches tall. 

#22 Sugar Plum (D. purpurea)

Sugar Plum grows up to 42 inches high and blooms heavily in summer. It is hardy to zones 5-9 and looks fantastic growing in groups. Flowers are lilac-pink bells, with heavily spotted dark purple throats. 

#23 Sutton’s Apricot (D. purpurea)

Prized for its beautiful color, Sutton’s Apricot has delicate pink-apricot flowers with pink speckled throats. This Foxglove plant grows up to 6 feet tall and blooms heavily early to mid-summer. Attractive to hummingbirds, they make great centerpieces in pollinator gardens. They are suitable for zones 5-9, and flower during their second year. 

#24 White-flowered Foxglove (D. purpurea f. albiflora)

The White-flowered Foxglove is a winner of the Award of Garden Merit from The Royal Horticultural Society. It is hardy to zones 4-8 and grows up to 5 feet tall. Flowers are creamy white, and throats are lightly speckled with orange.

#25 Illumination Pink (Hybrid)

Part of the “Illumination Series”, award-winning Ruby Pink (Plant of the Year 2012 – RHS Chelsea Flower Show) grows up to 36 inches high and has beautiful, bell-shaped flowers. Flowers are dark pink, with a pale orange throat dotted with dark pink spots, and bloom from June – November. This is a sterile Foxglove variety and won’t set seed.

#26 Illumination Ruby Slippers (Hybrid)

As part of the “Illumination Series”, Ruby Slippers can reach up to 36 inches high. It has bold, bell-shaped flowers which are dark pink, with a deep orange throat dotted with dark pink spots. The blooming period is from June – November. This variety is sterile and won’t self-seed.

#27 John Innes Tetra (Hybrid)

A compact Foxglove flower, John Innes Tetra grows up to 24 inches tall and has pale yellow flowers flushed and speckled with bronze.

#27 Lucas (Hybrid)

Lucas is a clump-forming Foxglove that has lilac-pink flowers with white throats speckled with purple. It grows up to 31 inches tall and is hardy to zones 4-8.

#28 Martina (Hybrid)

Martina grows up to 47 inches high and has pink flowers which bloom from early summer to early fall. Flower throats have white ringed, maroon speckles. This variety is sterile so won’t self-seed.

#29 Plum Gold (Hybrid)

Plum Gold reaches up to 24 inches and is hardy to zones 7-10. This beautiful Foxglove flower is dark pink with a flushed gold throat dotted with white ringed maroon speckles. 

#30 Polkadot Pippa (Hybrid)

Part of the “Polkadot” Series, this Foxglove plant has apricot-pink flowers and grows up to 32 inches tall. It is a great source of nectar for a wide variety of pollinators and therefore perfect for pollinator gardens. Blooms last from late spring to late summer. 

#31 Rose Ivory (Hybrid)

Hardy to zones 7-10, Rose Ivory grows up to 24 inches tall. This variety has pale rose-pink flowers with outward-facing tubes. The inner throat is pale apricot speckled with orange. 

#32 Spice Island (Hybrid)

This Foxglove plant grows up to 31 inches tall and has copper-yellow flowers, with pale yellow lower lips veined with darker tones. It is hardy to zones 4-9.

#33 Summer King (Hybrid)

Also known as the Strawberry Foxglove, this plant has strawberry-pink flowers with maroon-speckled throats. This is a compact Foxglove variety only reaching 3 feet tall. Hardy to zones 3-8, Summer King blooms heavily from late spring to early summer.